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Improving women's health - how you can help

To mark International Women’s Day, the government launched a 12-week call for evidence to better understand women’s experiences of the health and care system and all women are urged to share their experiences to form the basis of a new Women’s Health Strategy. The strategy will set an ambitious and positive new agenda to improve health and wellbeing and ensure health services are meeting the needs of women and place women’s voices at the centre of their care.

By better understanding women’s experiences, the government can ensure key parts of the health service are meeting women’s needs as they should be. The call for evidence has been designed to be user friendly, quick to fill in and easily accessible from people’s mobiles. People who live with and care for women, organisations with experience of providing services for women and those with an expertise in women’s health are also encouraged to share their views.

The 6 core-themes included in the call for evidence are:

  1. Placing women’s voices at the centre of their health and care – how the health and care system engages with and listens to women at the individual level as well as at the system level.

  2. Improving the quality and accessibility of information and education on women’s health – women having access to high-quality information when they need to make a decision, increasing health literacy, as well as increasing awareness and understanding of women’s health conditions among clinicians.

  3. Ensuring the health and care system understands and is responsive to women’s health and care needs across the life course – supporting women to maximise their health across their lives, and ensuring services are designed to maximise benefits for women.

  4. Maximising women’s health in the workplace – deepening our understanding of how women’s health issues can affect their workforce participation and outcomes, both with regards to female-specific issues such as the menopause, but also conditions that are more prevalent in women such as musculoskeletal conditions, depression or anxiety

  5. Ensuring that research, evidence and data support improvements in women’s health – inclusion of women and women’s health in research and data collection and how that information is used, and driving participation in clinical trials to support improvements in women’s health.

  6. Understanding and responding to the impacts of COVID-19 on women’s health – supporting women through the unique challenges they’ve faced during the pandemic.

The easiest way to participate in the call for evidence as an individual is by completing the public survey. Written submissions are also welcome from individuals or organisations who have expertise in women’s health, such as researchers and third-sector organisations. Written submissions can include the contribution of data, research and other reports of relevance to women’s health.

Frimley Health and Care